English Grammatical Terms

Letter M

(PG = Prescriptive Grammar  —  DG = Descriptive Grammar)

(GL = Grammatical Lingo  —  OB = Obtuse  —  NG = Not Grammatical)

The Above Is True In Both Traditional Grammar [TG] & The Grammar Of The Common Tongue [CTG]

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  • See Also:  “Letter” & “Consonant”
  • Main Verb  —  [GL]  The term “Main Verb” Is not a proper Grammatical Term.  It is Grammatical Lingo which is used by English teachers when talking about a Sentence that has more than one Verb. The so-called “Main Verb” is the only Verb which is actually acting as “The Action Of The Sentence”.

This is in contrast to any other Word in the Sentence that may technically be classified as a Verb — but in the sentence — is are probably acting as a Subject.

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  • See Also:  “Verb” & “Subject”
  • Metaphor  —  [PG]  The Term “Metaphor” Is used to refer to the Object in a Phrase which is used to describe something something else (the Subject) which it is not.  It is a way of comparing the Subject TO the Object by calling it that thing — because it may have similar properties or characteristics — (even if only in the mind of the person making the Statement).

So when an angry woman who does not like men says:  “All Men Are Pigs!” — Then the Metaphor is “Pigs”.  It is NOT the entire Phrase that is the Metaphor.  That may be the way it is described by those who follow Traditional Grammar.  But there is a lot about Traditional Grammar which is illogical & wrong.

In The Grammar Of The Common Tongue — The word “Metaphor” is correctly used to describe (as stated above) the Object of the Phrase.  So then we would say that the Phrase is Metaphorical;  It is a Metaphorical Phrase.

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  • See Also:  “Metaphor” & “Metaphorical Phrase”
  • Metaphorical Phrase  —  [PG]  The Term “Metaphorical Phrase” Is used to refer to ANY Phrase- or Phrasal-Form of a Grammatical Unit in-which the Object is used to describe the Subject, by saying that is IS that thing.  It is a way of comparing the Subject TO the Object because it may have similar Properties, Qualities, or Characteristics.

So when an angry woman who does not like men says:  “All Men Are Pigs!” — Since the word “Pigs” is a Metaphor used to describe the Subject “Men” — then “All Men Are Pigs” is a Metaphorical Phrase.  (Even thought it is not true.)

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  • Pronunciation Lesson  —  coming soon!
  • Video Lesson  —  coming soon!
  • See Also:  “Metaphor” & “Metaphorical”

This particular example of Descriptive Grammar is the PERFECT example of how — instead of realizing that there is a difference between the “Rules” and the “Regulations” of Grammar — instead — Those within the Traditional English teaching world try to come up with yet another “Rule” (which should be “regulation”) for something which they can not conceive DOES NOT NEED A RULE OR A REGULATION!!!

ALL Conditional Sentences can be “Mixed”.

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  • See Also:  “Letter” & “Consonant”

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  • Main Clause
  • Major Sentence
  • Mass NounAnother term for an Un-Countable Noun  — [su_button url=”http://www.blog.givemesomeenglish.com/un-countable-noun-grammar-lesson/” target=”blank” style=”flat” radius=”0″ icon=”icon: comment-o”]Read The Full Post Here[/su_button]
  • Maxim
  • Metaphor — The use of a word or phrase to refer to something that it is not.   Metaphor is used to express a point by showing the a similarity between the word or phrase used and the thing described.  However — the use of metaphor doe NOT use the wordslike” or “as” in the description.  Doing so would make the word or phrase a simile.   —  Examples:  Referring to a person as a “pig“, or referring to an idea as “pie in the sky” are both examples of Metaphors
  • Metaphorical — This is the adjectival form of the word Metaphor.  Describing a word or phrase as being “Metaphorical” means that the word or phrase functions as a Metaphor.  —  Example:  If I said that my wife is “my boss“, the phrase “my boss” or simply the word “boss” would be Metaphorical…  because she is not really my boss.
  • Middle Verb
  • Minimal Pair
  • Minor Sentence
  • Mixed Conditional
  • Modal
  • Modal Verb
  • Modifier — Any word, phrase, or clause that defines or describes – qualifies or quantifies the sense of another word or phrase.
  • Mondegreen
  • Mono-Lingual
  • Monosyllabic
  • Mood
  • Morpheme
  • Morphology
Grammar...

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